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Dr Michelle Simmons

Dr Michelle Simmons is an exceptional physicist and researcher who has made significant strides in the field of quantum computing, paving the way for revolutionary advancements in technology. Born in London, UK in 1967, she later moved to Australia, where she has become a pioneering figure in quantum physics and quantum computing.

Edith Cowan

Edith Cowan, an inspiring pioneer and tireless advocate for social reform, stands as a testament to the power of dedication and determination in the face of adversity. Born on August 2, 1861 in Western Australia, Cowan became the first woman to be elected to an Australian parliament, marking a significant milestone in the struggle for gender equality and representation.

Susan Heaney

Susan Heaney, our Homepage Hero for December, is the driving force behind Heaney’s Printing and Imaging Pty Ltd (HPIP) and its Managing Director, with over 30 years of experience in the print and superannuation industries.

Cathy Freeman 

Cathy Freeman, a name synonymous with grace, speed and resilience, stands as one of Australia’s most celebrated athletes and an inspirational figure in the realm of sport. Born on February 16, 1973 in Mackay, Queensland, Freeman emerged as a symbol of hope and unity, transcending her athletic prowess to advocate for social change and reconciliation.

Dame Mary Gilmore

Dame Mary Gilmore, a luminary of Australian literature and a champion of social justice, etched her name into history through her eloquent prose and tireless advocacy for the oppressed. Born in rural New South Wales in 1865, her early years were shaped by the struggles of a single-parent household and economic hardships. These experiences cultivated a deep empathy for the downtrodden and a desire to create a fairer society.

Marita Cheng

Marita Cheng is a robotics guru, technology entrepreneur, and women in technology advocate. She founded Aubot, telepresence robots giving children with cancer the ability to attend school virtually, and people with disability to attend work. She also cofounded Aipology, technology that recognises everyday objects for the blind. Her Robogals Challenge attracts young girls to STEM and engineering through education and robotics programs, and at 22 she led a team of four thousand people across thirteen countries.

Hon. Chief Justice Susan Kiefel

Justice Kiefel is the first female to be appointed the Chief Justice of Australia, which makes her the presiding Judge of the High Court and the highest-ranking judicial officer in the Commonwealth of Australia.

Lisa Blair

Lisa Blair is a sailor, climate change activist, and an inspirational keynote speaker. Lisa made history as the first woman to sail solo around Antarctica and in November of 2020, Lisa’s debut book Facing Fear was published by Australia Geographic.

Lisa is once again turning her attention to the Southern Ocean with the goal of sailing solo, non-stop and unassisted around Antartica, currently setting her fourth world record.

Ronnie Kahn

Ronni Kahn is an Australian social entrepreneur, and the founder and CEO of Australia’s largest food rescue non-profit OzHarvest. Ronni committedly works to combat food waste and to provide food relief to Australians. Her passion began when she owned a successful events management company and witnessed the large amounts of food being wasted in the hospitality industry. Unable to ignore this, she began delivering the food to homeless shelters across Sydney, a mission that has since extended to more than 1,800 charities.

Kate McClymont

Kate is known as Australia’s ‘queen of investigative journalism’ due to her fearless, uncompromising reporting. She is currently the chief investigative journalist at Sydney Morning Herald, and has unearthed extensive corruption within politics, the corporate world, trade unions and the crime underworld. Kate has won seven Walkley’s since beginning her career in the 1990s, including a Gold Walkley, the highest accolade a journalist can receive.

Queen Elizabeth II

After inheriting the throne at just 25, Queen Elizabeth II gave a lifetime of service to the job, providing a bedrock of stability for the monarchy as the world shifted around her.

Throughout her seven-decade reign, Elizabeth upheld the vow she once made as a young princess – “My whole life, whether it be long or short, shall be devoted to your service.” 

Her life was far longer than she perhaps expected, but her devotion never wavered.

Sam Kerr

As the striking force on the Matildas (the Australian women’s national soccer team), and now an international rising star at Chelsea F.C. in the Barclays Women’s Super League (the highest league of women’s football in England), Sam Kerr is making headlines for her virtuous sportsmanship, impeccable athleticism and unyielding talent.

Coming from sporting beginnings, Sam grew up in East Fremantle, Perth and was born into a family of athletes: her older brother and father played AFL and her uncle was a champion horse jockey who won the Melbourne Cup in 1966.

Nyadol Nyuon 

Nyadol Nyuon is a lawyer, community advocate, writer, and accomplished public speaker. She was born in a refugee camp in Itang, Ethiopia, and raised in Kakuma Refugee camp, Kenya. In 2005, at the age of eighteen, she moved to Australia as a refugee

She is a vocal advocate for human rights, multiculturalism, the settlement of people with refugee experiences and those seeking asylum. She has worked and volunteered extensively in these areas with a range of organisations.

Kimberley Kitching

Kimberley Jane Elizabeth Kitching was an Australian politician, lawyer, and trade unionist. A member of the Labor Party, she was a Senator for Victoria from October 2016 until her death in March 2022.

Kitching was a firm advocate of human rights protection and legislation and a proponent of Magnitsky-style legislation in Australia. She had introduced a private member’s bill in August 2021 before the government introduced its own bill in November 2021.

Nicci Russouw

Nicci Rossouw is a resident of Ferntree Gully in Melbourne and is the founder, owner and CEO of Exaptec Robots.

Exaptec specialise in customising Telepresence Robotics – i.e., robots for social and service, with a focus on inclusion for people with disability or illness. 

Rabia Siddique

Rabia Siddique is a retired British Army officer, criminal and human rights lawyer, and former terrorism and war crimes prosecutor. Whilst working as a lawyer in the British Army she was taken hostage while negotiating the release of British SAS chaps. She later took the brave action of suing the British Government for sexism and racism and became a catalyst for policy change to ensure a fairer workplace for women and cultural minorities in the military.

Ash Barty

Ash Barty, a proud Ngaragu woman, 2021 Wimbledon Winner and 2020 Young Australian of the Year recipient. Best female tennis player in the world, Ash inspires legions of fans across the world with her approachable, down-to-earth and hard-working nature. A leader by example, Ash is a proud spokesperson and role model for young Indigenous girls and Australians more broadly. It is the month of tennis and we celebrate the achievements and class of Ash Barty.

Julie Inman Grant

As Australia’s eSafety Commissioner, Julie Inman Grant leads a world first – a regulatory government agency committed to keeping its citizens safer online.

Julie plays an important global role as Chair of the Child Dignity Alliance’s Technical Working Group, as part of the role of Commissioner, and as a Board Member of the WePROTECT Global Alliance. 

Pearl Gibbs

Pearl Mary Gibbs “Gambanyi” was born on 18 July, 1901 to an Aboriginal mother and a non-Aboriginal father in La Perouse, New South Wales. Throughout her adult life Gibbs never faltered in her efforts for Indigenous justice over the decades that followed, a challenge that culminated in 1954 when the New South Wales Aborigines Welfare Board appointed her as its first—and only—female member. 

Marilyn Monroe

When Ella Fitzgerald couldn’t get booked by clubs and TV because she was considered an ‘unglamorous black jazz musician’, Marilyn Monroe offered to come to a nightclub every night and sit in the front row if they let Ella sing. That’s how you use your privilege for good and honour the sisterhood with kindness and support.

Opal Lee

19th June 1939 saw the end of slavery in the US, Opal Lee was 12 when a mob of white supremacists vandalised and set fire to her family’s home while police stood by watching the violence. Ms Lee channelled her experiences of racism into a life of teaching, activism and campaigning. For decades, Ms Lee worked tirelessly to get Juneteenth recognised as a national holiday in the US. Now aged 94, Ms Lee has finally got her day off with the holiday being granted in 2021

Dr Katalin Karikó

Dr Karikó is a Hungarian-American scientist whose work through 1990’s and 2000’s paved the way for the mRNA COVID-19 vaccine development. It is estimated that without her ground-breaking research, vaccine development would have taken more than 20 years. Along with her research partner Dr Drew Weissman, Kati (as she is known in the USA) holds the patents that are licensed to both BionTech (Pfizer)… 

Emma Mckeon

Born 24 May 1994, Emma McKeon is an Australian competitive swimmer. McKeon has won eleven Olympic medals making her the most decorated Australian Olympic athlete of all time. Followed only by Leisel Jones and Ian Thorpe who both hold 9 medals. Well done Emma for your commitment to your passion and inspiring us all in Tokyo.

Marjorie Pagani

A Barrister for thirty years before stepping into the philanthropic sector, Marjorie Pagani is the CEO of Angel Flight. A well-revered and much needed charity delivering care flights for those in need across Australia.

We applaud Marjorie this month, not only for her strong leadership across her career as a senior legal professional and advocate for those in need, but also for her quick action…

Hellen Reddy

I am woman, hear me roar
In numbers too big to ignore
And I know too much to go back an’ pretend
‘Cause I’ve heard it all before
And I’ve been down there on the floor
No one’s ever gonna keep me down again.

Helen Reddy, 1941 – 2020. 

Angela Merkel

We celebrate and congratulate Chancellor Angela Merkel who has retired from party leadership and has handed over to the new German Chancellor.

Chancellor Merkel is a wonderful example of authentic leadership, and Women in Print applauds Ms Merkel for her dedication, leadership, strength, and sincerity, and wishes her well for the next chapter of her life.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg

“When I’m sometimes asked ‘When will there be enough [women on the Supreme Court]?’ and I say ‘When there are nine,’ people are shocked. But there’d been nine men, and nobody’s ever raised a question about that.” – Ruth Bader Ginsberg, Supreme Court Justice, United States Supreme Court, 1933-2020.

 

Olive May Kelso King

(30 June 1885 – 1 November 1958) was a Sydney-born, Australian war hero. During WWI she drove ambulances for the Scottish Women’s Hospitals and Serbian Army.

Olive served supplying her own vehicle (Ella), in Belgium, France, Macedonia, Greece and Serbia. In one battle, the Bulgarian forces were advancing rapidly and her station hospital had to be evacuated in 24 hours…

Dr Michelle Simmons

Dr Michelle Simmons is an exceptional physicist and researcher who has made significant strides in the field of quantum computing, paving the way for revolutionary advancements in technology. Born in London, UK in 1967, she later moved to Australia, where she has become a pioneering figure in quantum physics and quantum computing.

Dr Simmons’ academic journey is distinguished by her studies at the University of Durham and her subsequent move to Australia to pursue a Ph.D. at the University of New South Wales (UNSW). Her research interests predominantly revolve around developing solid-state quantum bits, or qubits, which are fundamental to the realisation of quantum computing.

A pivotal moment in Dr Simmons’ career came with her leadership in the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology at UNSW. Under her guidance, the centre achieved groundbreaking success in fabricating the world’s first single-atom transistor, a monumental leap in the field of quantum computing. This accomplishment showcased her unparalleled expertise in nanotechnology and solid-state physics.

Moreover, Dr Simmons is the Director of the Quantum Computation and Communication Technology company, further emphasising her commitment to translating research into real-world applications. Her vision extends beyond academic achievements, as she actively encourages collaboration and interdisciplinary research, embodying the spirit of innovation and progress.

Her achievements have been widely recognised, earning her several prestigious awards, including being named Australian of the Year in 2018. Dr Simmons’ dedication to quantum research continues to shape the landscape of computing and has positioned Australia as a global leader in the field. Her work serves as an inspiration for aspiring scientists and emphasises the potential for groundbreaking discoveries through a relentless pursuit of knowledge and innovation.

Edith Cowan

Edith Cowan, an inspiring pioneer and tireless advocate for social reform, stands as a testament to the power of dedication and determination in the face of adversity. Born on August 2, 1861 in Western Australia, Cowan became the first woman to be elected to an Australian parliament, marking a significant milestone in the struggle for gender equality and representation.

Cowan’s early life was marked by tragedy, with the loss of her mother at a young age and a difficult marriage. Despite these hardships, she demonstrated an unwavering commitment to the betterment of society, particularly in the areas of children’s welfare and women’s rights. Cowan co-founded the Karrakatta Club, a women’s group focused on self-improvement and community service, paving the way for her later public service.

In 1921, Edith Cowan achieved a historic victory by winning a seat in the West Australian Legislative Assembly. Her election was a groundbreaking moment, enabling her to advocate for vital issues such as children’s rights, public health and education. Her remarkable career in politics was characterised by a dedication to social justice, and she played a pivotal role in the introduction of several progressive reforms.

Cowan’s legacy extends far beyond her political career. Her efforts led to the establishment of the Children’s Protection Society and the King Edward Memorial Hospital for Women, further cementing her commitment to improving the lives of women and children. Today, her pioneering spirit continues to inspire women in public service and remains a beacon for the ongoing struggle for gender equality.

Edith Cowan’s enduring legacy is a reminder of the impact one person can have in the quest for a fair and just society. Her life’s work symbolises resilience, determination, and an unyielding dedication to making a positive difference in the lives of others.

Susan Heaney

Susan Heaney, our HomePage Hero for December, is the driving force behind Heaney’s Printing and Imaging Pty Ltd (HPIP) and its Managing Director, with over 30 years of experience in the print and superannuation industries.

As the Managing Director of Heaney’s, Susan has dedicated decades to the company, ensuring exceptional service and product quality. Susan is the founder of Women in Print and was its Queensland Patron for over a decade; she chaired the board of the now Visual Media Association when it was the Printing Industries Association of Australia, making history as the association’s first women President in its 124-year history.  Recognised for her outstanding contributions, Susan has been awarded the Inaugural Female Manufacturer of the Year at the 2012 Annual Endeavour Awards and has also Chaired the Media Super Board.

Susan is an international speaker, making her debut many years ago at the Women in Print conference during DRUPA in Dusseldorf, Germany. Among five global speakers, she shared her extensive business experience with over 100 participants. Susan’s commitment extends beyond the boardroom, as is evident in how Women in Print Australia has gone from strength to strength under her leadership.

From humble beginnings, Women in Print has grown into a national movement that supports and empowers women at all levels of industry.

Known for her determination, passion and dedication, Women in Print pays homage to Susan Heaney, our founder.

Cathy Freeman

Cathy Freeman, a name synonymous with grace, speed and resilience, stands as one of Australia’s most celebrated athletes and an inspirational figure in the realm of sport. Born on February 16, 1973 in Mackay, Queensland, Freeman emerged as a symbol of hope and unity, transcending her athletic prowess to advocate for social change and reconciliation.
Freeman’s story is one of determination and triumph over adversity. From a young age she exhibited a natural talent for athletics. Her journey to the pinnacle of the sporting world was not without its challenges, including battles with discrimination and racial prejudice. Despite facing these obstacles, Freeman’s unyielding spirit and relentless commitment to her passion propelled her forward.

She etched her name in history during the 2000 Sydney Olympics, where she captivated the world by winning the gold medal in the 400 meters, becoming the first Aboriginal Australian to achieve such a feat. What made this victory even more poignant was her choice to carry both the Australian and Aboriginal flags during her victory lap, a powerful symbol of reconciliation and unity for a nation marred by historical injustices.

Beyond her achievements on the track, Freeman has actively used her influence to advocate for Indigenous rights and better education for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children through the Cathy Freeman Foundation. She has consistently lent her voice to various charitable causes, striving to make a positive impact on the lives of young Australians.

Cathy Freeman’s legacy extends beyond her athletic achievements, embodying the resilience and strength of character necessary to overcome barriers and unite a nation. She remains an enduring inspiration, a pillar of encouragement for aspiring athletes and advocates for social justice. Her indelible mark on Australian history is a testament to the profound impact that one individual’s determination and courage can have on an entire nation.

Dame Mary Gilmore

Dame Mary Gilmore, a luminary of Australian literature and a champion of social justice, etched her name into history through her eloquent prose and tireless advocacy for the oppressed. Born in rural New South Wales in 1865, her early years were shaped by the struggles of a single-parent household and economic hardships. These experiences cultivated a deep empathy for the downtrodden and a desire to create a fairer society.

Gilmore’s literary prowess blossomed over the years, captivating readers with her evocative poetry and insightful commentary. She became a prominent voice for the labour movement, capturing the essence of workers’ lives and the stark realities they faced. Her work was not only a form of artistic expression but a call to action for societal change, advocating for workers’ rights and social equality.

As a suffragist, Gilmore fought for the rights of women, believing passionately in their equal standing in society and their importance as active participants in political and cultural realms. She was unafraid to challenge the norm and voice her beliefs, making a profound impact on the Australian feminist movement.

In her later years, Gilmore continued to write, using her platform to express her views on social and political issues. Her literary contributions were recognised and celebrated, earning her numerous accolades and honours. She passed away in 1962, leaving behind a legacy that continues to inspire writers, activists, and all those who seek a fair and compassionate society.

Dame Mary Gilmore’s life story epitomises the power of words and resilience in the face of adversity. She remains an enduring figure, a beacon of hope for generations, urging society to strive for a world where equality, compassion and justice prevail.

Marita Cheng

Marita Cheng is a robotics guru, technology entrepreneur, and women in technology advocate. She founded Aubot, telepresence robots giving children with cancer the ability to attend school virtually, and people with disability to attend work. She also cofounded Aipology, technology that recognises everyday objects for the blind. Her Robogals Challenge attracts young girls to STEM and engineering through education and robotics programs, and at 22 she led a team of four thousand people across thirteen countries.

Marita’s extensive work has earned her the title of Young Australian of the Year in 2012, Member of the Order of Australia for her service to science, tech, and robotics in 2019, and being listed on Forbes 30 Under 30. Women in Print admire Marita’s dedication to science and technology, and for paving a path for young women to enter a traditionally male-dominated field.

Hon. Chief Justice Susan Kiefel

Justice Kiefel is the first female to be appointed the Chief Justice of Australia, which makes her the presiding Judge of the High Court and the highest-ranking judicial officer in the Commonwealth of Australia.

Justice Kiefel’s background and story is an inspiration, and she is a trailblazer for women in the profession. She dropped out of school at the age of fifteen to gain financial independence and has worked hard after gaining her first job as a receptionist at a Brisbane law firm to juggle independence and the attainment of further education.

Justice Kiefel upholds a significant position of leadership as the courts figurehead and is responsible for key administration tasks within the court. Justice Kiefel has been involved in many high-profile judgements throughout her career.

Lisa Blair

Lisa Blair is a sailor, climate change activist, and an inspirational keynote speaker. Lisa made history as the first woman to sail solo around Antarctica and is currently setting her fourth world record.

Lisa achieved her goal on April 4th, 2017, despite freezing conditions, snow and hailstorms, and intense isolation and fatigue. Lisa was awarded the Spirit of Adventure award by Australian Geographic and finished off the year by leading the first all-female team in 16 years to race in the Rolex 2017 Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race. Lisa’s yacht is named ‘Climate Action Now,’ bringing awareness to the impacts of climate change that she has personally observed through weather conditions, during her seventeen years sailing.

Ronnie Kahn

Ronni Kahn is an Australian social entrepreneur, and the founder and CEO of Australia’s largest food rescue non-profit OzHarvest. Ronni committedly works to combat food waste and to provide food relief to Australians. Her passion began when she owned a successful events management company and witnessed the large amounts of food being wasted in the hospitality industry. Unable to ignore this, she began delivering the food to homeless shelters across Sydney, a mission that has since extended to more than 1,800 charities.

Ronni grew up in apartheid-era South Africa, an experience that made her aware of discrimination from an early age, guiding her values and hopes today of equality and food access for all. Ronnie serves in an advisory capacity to government and has worked to amend legislation that now allows food donors to provide their surplus food to charities without fear of liability.

Kate McClymont

Kate is known as Australia’s ‘queen of investigative journalism’ due to her fearless, uncompromising reporting. She is currently the chief investigative journalist at Sydney Morning Herald, and has unearthed extensive corruption within politics, the corporate world, trade unions and the crime underworld. Kate has won seven Walkley’s since beginning her career in the 1990s, including a Gold Walkley, the highest accolade a journalist can receive.

Kate’s reporting has led to multiple investigations and Independent Commissions Against Corruption, with the most notable being that of Ebbie Obeid. Ebbie was a former New South Wales Labor party politician sentenced to five years imprisonment in 2016, for misconduct in public office, Kate helped bring to light.

Women in Print applaud Kate for her relentless and courageous pursuit of truth. Kate continues her reporting in the face of death threats, lawsuits, black mail, and intimidation, which is no easy feat.

Queen Elizabeth II

After inheriting the throne at just 25, Queen Elizabeth II gave a lifetime of service to the job, providing a bedrock of stability for the monarchy as the world shifted around her.

Throughout her seven-decade reign, Elizabeth upheld the vow she once made as a young princess – “My whole life, whether it be long or short, shall be devoted to your service.” 

Her life was far longer than she perhaps expected, but her devotion never wavered.

The Queen’s schedule remained largely unchanged over several decades. Every day brought a steady stream of correspondence, cabinet minutes and state papers that arrived in Red Boxes.

In the afternoons the Queen turned her attention to official engagements, clocking up hundreds of appearances each year. Tuesday evenings were reserved for the prime minister.

The constant workload meant Elizabeth had more in common with working mothers than perhaps any monarch before her. “Most people have a job and then they go home,” she told the BBC in 1992.

“And in this existence, the job and the life go on together because you can’t really divide it.” At a time when women were meant to be seen, not heard, Elizabeth was the head of a kingdom and her own family leading one of the strongest feminism movements by action. 

She was with us through the Cuban missile crisis, the Moon landing, the demise of apartheid, the fall of tyrannies, the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, COVID and the Ukraine-Russian War.

Queen Elizabeth II met, if only briefly, millions across the globe. She answered at least 3.5 million items of correspondence, and sent at least 100,000 telegrams to centenarians. She amassed a legion of fans, and carved out a place in pop culture.

A source of strength and inspiration, many saw Elizabeth as the mother — or grandmother — of the Commonwealth.

The reign of her namesake, Elizabeth I, was known as England’s “Golden Age” for its decades of peace and prosperity. As the world exits its second Elizabethan era, it is too early to say how it will be remembered. 

It featured moments of great joy and stability. But there was also despair and pain. Through it all, the little girl who was never meant to rule held true to the promise she made as a young princess and provided leadership and strength for girls and women across the world.

Sam Kerr

As the striking force on the Matildas (the Australian women’s national soccer team), and now an international rising star at Chelsea F.C. in the Barclays Women’s Super League (the highest league of women’s football in England), Sam Kerr is making headlines for her virtuous sportsmanship, impeccable athleticism and unyielding talent.

Coming from sporting beginnings, Sam grew up in East Fremantle, Perth and was born into a family of athletes: her older brother and father played AFL and her uncle was a champion horse jockey who won the Melbourne Cup in 1966.

Introduced to footy at a young age, Sam was playing Aussie Rules up until she was about 12, after which her family one day decided playing with the boys was getting a bit too rough, seeing as there was no league for girls while she was growing up. Soccer had always been a sort of ‘back-up’ sport for her, until she made it her sole focus and debuted for the Matildas only three years later at the sprightly young age of 15.

Since then, her aptitude for the sport has seen her score 56 goals in 108 appearances for Australia, and as of 2022, Sam is the all-time leading Australian international scorer, both male and female, and is the all-time leading scorer in the National Women’s Soccer League in the United States.

Not just a phenomenal player but a role model as well, Sam is the first woman to feature on the upcoming global edition of the popular game, EA Sports’ FIFA 23—a historic moment for women, not just in soccer, but in all sports too.

Nicci Russouw

Nicci Rossouw is a resident of Ferntree Gully in Melbourne and is the founder, owner and CEO of Exaptec Robots.

Exaptec specialise in customising Telepresence Robotics – i.e., robots for social and service, with a focus on inclusion for people with disability or illness. The robots are used by children in long-stay hospital admissions to remotely attend school while undergoing treatments that render them bed-ridden, as well as in aged care settings.

A thought leader in the realm of Robotics technology, Nicci is listed as one of the “30 women to know in robotics in 2020” (covering China, Japan, Malaysia, Israel, Australia, Canada, United States, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Norway, Spain, the Netherlands, India and Iran).

Nicci aligns herself with seeing robotics helping people on the most fundamental level and is a powerful female entrepreneurial force in the male dominated STEM industry.

Rabia Siddique

Rabia Siddique is a retired British Army officer, criminal and human rights lawyer, and former terrorism and war crimes prosecutor. Whilst working as a lawyer in the British Army she was taken hostage while negotiating the release of British SAS chaps. She later took the brave action of suing the British Government for sexism and racism and became a catalyst for policy change to ensure a fairer workplace for women and cultural minorities in the military. A recipient of a Queen’s commendation for her work in Iraq, Rabia has received numerous awards for her human rights and community aid work in the Middle East, South Africa, the United Kingdom and Australia. Not only has she had an impressive career, she is also a mother of triplet sons. Rabia lives by the words of Mahatma Gandhi, ‘be the change you wish to see in the world’. She is an inspiration to all.

Julie Inman Grant

As Australia’s eSafety Commissioner, Julie Inman Grant leads a world first – a regulatory government agency committed to keeping its citizens safer online.

Julie plays an important global role as Chair of the Child Dignity Alliance’s Technical Working Group, as part of the role of Commissioner, and as a Board Member of the WePROTECT Global Alliance. Recently designated one of Australia’s most influential women by the Australian Financial Review and a leading Australian in Foreign Affairs by the Sydney Morning Herald. The World Economic Forum and Apolitical designated the Commissioner as one of the world’s most influential leaders revolutionising government.

Women in Print Australia applauds the important work done by the Commissioner in keeping our communities safe online.

Pearl Mary Gibbs

Pearl Mary Gibbs “Gambanyi” was born on 18 July, 1901 to an Aboriginal mother and a non-Aboriginal father in La Perouse, New South Wales. Throughout her adult life Gibbs never faltered in her efforts for Indigenous justice over the decades that followed, a challenge that culminated in 1954 when the New South Wales Aborigines Welfare Board appointed her as its first—and only—female member. She also helped organize the Aboriginal-Australian Fellowship (AAF) in 1956. With Gibbs at the helm, the AAF petitioned for a change in the Australian constitution, which paved the way for the 1967 referendum that granted Indigenous Australians suffrage and citizenship.  Gibb’s is a reminder that individuals can effect great change in society with focus and determination. Gibbs reflects in today’s leaders, showing that compassionate, empathy driven leadership is extremely effective. Australia is in no small part a better place today for having Pearl Gibb’s in our history.

Dr Katalin Karikó

Dr Karikó is a Hungarian-American scientist whose work through 1990’s and 2000’s paved the way for the mRNA COVID-19 vaccine development. It is estimated that without her ground-breaking research, vaccine development would have taken more than 20 years. Along with her research partner Dr Drew Weissman, Kati (as she is known in the USA) holds the patents that are licensed to both BionTech (Pfizer) and Moderna in the development of their vaccines.  The world thanks you for your tireless scientific endeavours Dr Karikó, which in no small measure have already, and will continue to save lives.

Marjorie Pagani

A Barrister for thirty years before stepping into the philanthropic sector, Marjorie Pagani is the CEO of Angel Flight. A well-revered and much needed charity delivering care flights for those in need across Australia.

We applaud Marjorie this month, not only for her strong leadership across her career as a senior legal professional and advocate for those in need, but also for her quick action shown to support a daughter caught in COVID border restrictions unable to see her ailing father. This care-flight and quick response demonstrated the critical leadership we all aspire to – kindness and humanity agendas are what create leaders we are inspired by and we congratulate Marjorie and all the team at Angel Flight.

Olive May Kelso King

(30 June 1885 – 1 November 1958) was a Sydney-born, Australian war hero. During WWI she drove ambulances for the Scottish Women’s Hospitals and Serbian Army.

Olive served supplying her own vehicle (Ella), in Belgium, France, Macedonia, Greece and Serbia. In one battle, the Bulgarian forces were advancing rapidly and her station hospital had to be evacuated in 24 hours, a seemingly impossible task for 30 women. When joining Serbian army as a driver attached to the Headquarters of the Medical Service at Salonika, the Serbs had lost most of their transport and ‘Ella’ was one of only three cars attached to the Medical Headquarters.

On 18 August 1917, the day of the Great Thessaloniki Fire of 1917, Olive May Kelso King transported people and records to safety, driving for twenty four hours at a stretch. For this effort, Olive was awarded the Serbian silver medal for bravery. Despite all the odds and all those who encouraged her to sit the war out Olive May Kelso King showed the inner strength and spirit of a woman with her own mind and her own drive.

Rita Karagiannis

Account Director,
IVE Group Data-Driven Communications

Rita is an Account Director at IVE Group in the Data-Driven Communications business. With twenty years’ experience in mail and data communications Rita has built an expansive career across operations and productions into strategic sales and client service roles. With a Bachelor of Business in Information Systems, Rita offers her team and clients operational and technical expertise into her account management and customer solutions approach. IVE Group is well recognised for building strong female leadership programs and Rita has embraced this enthusiastically with recent graduation of a Leader Factor 4 – Stages of Psychological Leadership program. Rita is a passionate, intelligent and deliverable-centric individual who currently holds the Women in Print – Victorian Patron role.